www.mfat.govt.nz www.safetravel.govt.nz
New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs & Trade.
.Treaties for which NZ is DepositaryTrade law and free trade agreementsTreaty making processInternational Treaties ListMaritimeForestry and AgricultureArts and CultureTrade and InvestmentIntellectual PropertyEnvironment and ScienceHuman RightsHealthDefence and SecurityPrivate International LawExtraditionCorruptionDouble Tax AgreementsEmploymentTransportSocial SecurityNational Interest AnalysesRecent Treaty ActionsArchived Treaty ActionsEngagement with MaoriTreaty CriteriaTreaty registerLaw of the Sea and FisheriesInternational Humanitarian LawInternational Courts and TribunalsPrivate International LawDiplomatic Privileges and ImmunitiesUnited Nations Security Council SanctionsInternational Law Events

Related Resources

External Links

Country/territory locator

Enter the country or territory for the information paper you want. (We do not have information papers on all countries.)

World map. Africa Europe Middle East North Asia South/South East Asia Australia Pacific Latin America North America/Caribbean

 

Glossary

Although we have tried to use plain English content on the site, you may come across specialist terms and acronyms. Find out what they mean in our glossary of terms.

If you come across a term that isn't included in the Glossary please send us an email.

Treaties and International Law

International Treaties List as at July 2012

Arts, Culture and Heritage (including Education)

16. Film Co-Production Agreements

Bilateral film co-production agreements facilitate and encourage co-productions between the respective countries’ film industries. Most recent agreements adopt a broad definition of ‘film’ – to mean “an aggregate of images, or images and sounds, embodied in any material, and includes television and video recordings, animations and digital format productions”.

This type of agreement is intended to promote cultural understanding and to advantage the screen production industries in both New Zealand and the respective bilateral partner, on a project-by-project basis. Subject to the law in force in each country, such benefits are typically: access to funding, incentives and distribution arrangements, temporary ‘free’ entry of nationals of the other country and admission of cinematographic equipment for the purpose of making or promoting a co-production film.

Lead agency: 
Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Particular interest to Maori and other groups:
The impact on Māori interests will vary according to the content and subject of the film projects that gain approval as formal co-productions under an agreement. As a rule, the impact on Māori will be consistent with the impact on both the wider screen production industry and the New Zealand population generally. Māori and Māori culture are likely to feature highly in some co-production projects.

Legislation required:
No.

Contact:

Fiona Gregson
Senior Policy Adviser
Ministry for Culture and Heritage
Email: fiona.gregson@mch.govt.nz
Ph: (04) 496 6356
Fax: (04) 499 4490

 
17. UNESCO: Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict 1954, and its two protocols
Common Name: The 1954 Hague Convention

The objective of the Convention is to provide a regime that will protect cultural property of significance in times of armed conflict. The Convention defines “cultural property” as “movable or immovable property of great importance to the cultural heritage of every people…”.  Parties to the Convention are obliged to refrain from using cultural property in a manner which is likely to expose that property to destruction or damage in the event of armed conflict. Parties are also obliged to refrain from an act of hostility directed against such property. The Convention is supplemented by two Protocols.  The first deals with the illegal export of cultural property in times of armed conflict, and the second provides reinforced measures to support the Convention, including the establishment of a regime of ‘enhanced protection’ for cultural property that is of the greatest importance for humanity.

Lead agency:

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Status:

Multilateral. New Zealand pledged at the 2003 International Red Cross Conference in Geneva that it would give early consideration to possible accession to the Convention. The Parliamentary Treaty Examination process for the Convention and its protocols was completed in May 2008. The instrument of ratification for the Convention was deposited with United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation on 24 July 2008, with the Convention taking effect for New Zealand on 24 October 2008.

Accession to the Protocols cannot take place until relevant legislation has been enacted. The Cultural Property (Protection in Armed Conflict) Bill was introduced to the House on 26 August 2008, had its first reading on 2 September 2008, and was referred to the Government Administration Committee. The Bill was reported back to the House on 29 May 2009.

The Committee’s report can be read on the New Zealand Parliament website [external link]

The Bill was read a second time on 20 August 2009.

Websites:
Convention [external link to UNESCO]
First Protocol [external link to UNESCO]
Second Protocol [external link to UNESCO]

Particular interest to Maori and other groups:
This Convention will protect cultural property that is of importance to New Zealanders. It is anticipated that significant amounts of Maori cultural property will meet the test of being of ‘great importance’ for the purposes of the Convention. The Ministry for Culture and Heritage therefore has consulted widely with Maori on this issue, and will continue to do so.

Legislation Required:
Yes. The relevant legislation was introduced to the House during 2008.

Contact:
Edward Siddle
Senior Policy Adviser
Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Email: edward.siddle@mch.govt.nz
Ph: (04) 495 2562
Fax: (04) 499 4490

 
18. Asia-Pacific Convention on the Recognition of Qualifications in Higher Education
Common Name: The Asia Pacific Regional Convention

The Asia Pacific Regional Convention was adopted at the International Conference of States, Bangkok 1983.  It is the Asia Pacific region’s counterpart to the Convention on the Recognition of Qualifications Concerning Higher Education in the European Region (The Lisbon Recognition Convention 1997).  However, it is a more detailed and technical document. For a number of reasons New Zealand has, to date, chosen not to accede to the Asia Pacific Regional Convention.

The obligations under the proposed new Asia Pacific Regional Convention are similar to the Lisbon Recognition Convention 1997:

Lead agency:
New Zealand Qualifications Authority

Status:
Multilateral. Following the tenth Asia Pacific Regional Convention in May 2009 the NewZealand government was asked to comment on the revised redraft of the Asia Pacific Regional Convention. While NewZealand is not a full member of the Asia Pacific Regional Convention, the NewZealand Qualifications Authority has been involved in the redrafting process, providing comment on the draft sections as they have developed. The final text is being promulgated by UNESCO; should this be ratified by member states of the Asia Pacific Region and conform to New Zealand’s interests, New Zealand is likely to start the formal process for accession following the International Conference of States in Tokyo, Japan on 25-26 November 2011. Ministers reviewed amendments to the convention and adopted the revised 1983 Convention text, and seven parties became initial signatories. This resulted in the formerly titled Regional Convention on the Recognition of Studies, Diplomas and Degrees in Higher Education in Asia and the Pacific being renamed as the Asia-Pacific Regional Convention on the Recognition of Qualifications in Higher Education.

Website:
Regional Convention on the Recognition of Studies, Diplomas and Degrees in Higher Education in Asia and the Pacific [external link]

Particular interest to Maori and other groups:
No perceived potential impact on Māori interests. New Zealand’s three wānanga will be consulted alongside other tertiary education organisations.

Interest from New Zealand’s tertiary education organisations including sector organisations and Institutes of Technology and Polytechnics.

Legislation Required:

No.

Contact:
Kerry Armstrong
Policy Analyst
Policy Unit
New Zealand Qualifications Authority

Email: kerry.armstrong@nzqa.govt.nz
Ph: (04) 463 3048
Fax: (04) 802 3426

Back to Treaties List Index

top of page

Page last updated: Monday, 30 July 2012 11:44 NZST