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Driving in Mexico

It is strongly recommended that you obtain an International Driving Permit to drive in Mexico.

An International Driving Permit is an internationally recognised document which is a translation of your current Driver Licence. It is not a Driver Licence in its own right, so you'll also need to carry your current New Zealand Driver Licence when you travel.

International Driving Permits are valid for a maximum of one year from the date of issue.

To obtain an International Driving Permit you need to submit an application in the country where your licence was issued. In New Zealand, International Driving Permits are issued by the Automobile Association (external link).

If you are overseas you can apply for an International Driving Permit by mail or on-line. Different fees apply for each. For further information, please refer to the Automobile Association (external link) website.

Eligibility for medical services

New Zealand does not have reciprocal health agreements with Mexico. Therefore, New Zealand citizens have no rights to access the public health system in these countries.

New Zealanders travelling overseas are strongly advised to take out private health insurance to cover the cost of medical treatment.

Getting married in Mexico

There are a number of requirements that must be fulfilled if foreigners are to marry in Mexico and if a foreigner is to marry a Mexican national.

Please refer to information on the website of the Mexican Embassy in New Zealand (external link).

Mexican police certificates

Mexican police certificates may be obtained from the state delegations or central offices of the Procuraduria General de la Republica (PGR).

Please contact the Mexican Embassy in New Zealand (external link) for a full list of requirements.

Reporting an assault or theft in Mexico

To file a police report in case of an assault, mugging, robbery or theft, you should report to the nearest "Agencia del Ministerio Público".

The following "Agencias del Ministerio Público" are listed in Mexico City:

Paseo de la Reforma 42 - Ground level; Col. Centro; Tel: (+52 55) 5292 2665;  Opening hours: 9.00am - 5.00 pm

Calle Amberes esquina con Londres; Col. Juárez; Tel: (+52 55) 5345 5382; Opening Hours: 9.00am - 5.00 pm

Calle Victoria 78; Col. Centro; Tel: (+52 55) 5346 8724; Opening Hours: 9.00am - 3.00 pm and 5.00pm – 7.00pm

 

In addition, the Mexican Ministry of Tourism provides INFOTUR, a 24 hour toll free help line which may be dialed from any part of Mexico and offers emergency assistance: (01 800) 987 8224.

Procedure to report an assault in Mexico:

  • Make sure you have some form of photo identification such as a passport to report the complaint;
  • Complete the procedural complaint form;
  • Wait for an interview with one of the Ministerio Público's agents. Assistance from an interpreter can be provided if needed;
  • At the end of such an interview the Ministerio agent will provide a copy of the procedural complaint form with a copy of the interview; and
  • The agent will provide the date on which a response to the complaint will be given.

Visitor, student and work permits for Mexico

New Zealanders are able to visit Mexico as tourists for a maximum of 180 days. For extended stays, you must apply for a temporary or permanent resident visa at the Mexican Embassy in New Zealand before travelling to Mexico. For information on obtaining visitor, student and work permits for Mexico, and any other general immigration enquiries, please contact the Mexican Embassy in New Zealand (external link) or the National Immigration Institute (external link). Information about the Mexico-New Zealand Working Holiday Scheme can be found here.

Mexican Embassy in New Zealand
185-187 Featherston St
Level 2 (AMP Chambers)
Wellington
Ph: +64 4 472 0555
Email: embassy.of.mexico@actrix.co.nz

Instituto Nacional de Migración (National Immigration Institute)
Av. Ejército Nacional 862
Col. Los Morales Sección Palmas
Delegación Miguel Hidalgo
C.P. 11540
México D.F.
Ph: (+52 55) 5387 2400