Join us this COP24 for a speaker series to hear real-world lessons on how to increase agricultural productivity, reduce emissions and build resilience to climate change impacts.

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The triple win improves food security for vulnerable communities, produces more food as the global population grows, and achieves the Paris Agreement adaptation and mitigation goals.

We’re putting together an incredible list of presenters from around the world to share their experiences with you. So get planning! We invite you to come in with an open mind, and leave ready to make a difference.

Coverage of Act!on Agriculture at COP24 (external link)

Act!on Agriculture Programme [PDF, 70 KB]

Act!on Agriculture Pavilion map [PDF, 368 KB]

 

COP24 dates
 

Why agriculture?

The global population will grow by another 2.3 billion people by 2050 – this means we’ll need to produce more food in the next 50 years, than in the past 500.

Globally, agriculture produces about 12-14 percent of total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

To meet the Paris Agreement’s goals, we’ll need to reduce agriculture emissions by at least 1Gt (or about 15 percent) a year by 2030.

We need farming systems that reduce emissions without reducing food.  

 

  
Join us for three days of expert panels, Q&A sessions, information and networking.

   

 

 1.30pm-2.30pm

Ministerial opening

The Paris Agreement has a collective aim to limit temperature rise from climate change. It recognises the importance of food production and food security as a fundamental priority. Across the world, countries are responding by encouraging greater efficiency of food production in ways that limit greenhouse gas emissions. In this session, ministers will discuss some of these challenges, to begin to understand the role the agriculture sector can play in achieving the aims of the Paris Agreement.

Welcome:

  • Hon James Shaw, Minister for Climate Change, New Zealand

Keynote:

  • Dr Theo de Jager, President, World Farmers' Organisation
  • Ministers will be joining Minister Shaw for the discussion. 

 

2.45pm-4.15pm

Farmers working towards lower emissions

Farmers the world over want to improve their livelihoods, build resilience to the impacts of climate change and reduce their emissions.  They want to grow the best, most nutritious food they can. Farmers and governments acknowledge that they are not necessarily well equipped to achieve this.  Disseminating information to millions of farmers around the world is a considerable challenge. One of the best ways to meet this challenge is for farmers to get together and share stories of what they are doing – in other words, learn from each other. 

Facilitator:  

  • David Burger, Strategy and Investment Leader Responsible Dairy, Dairy NZ

Panel:   

  • Craige McKenzie, Founder & Director, Agri Optics, New Zealand
  • Turi McFarlane, Nuffield Scholar, New Zealand
  • Ben O’Brien, European Regional Manager, Beef + Lamb New Zealand 
  • Christopher Brankin, Policy Adviser Strategy and Influence, Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu, New Zealand

 

4.30pm – 5.30pm

Resilient, productive, efficient: Pacific agriculture under the Paris Agreement

The agriculture sector makes up over half of Pacific Island employment, and agricultural products make up a higher share of Pacific Island trade than in any other region on earth. New technologies, techniques and practices that are tailored for the Pacific can build productive and resilient agricultural systems while reducing emissions. This session will bring together scientists and farmers to discuss how Pacific agricultural systems can thrive in an emissions-constrained world.

Moderator:  

  • Margarita Astralaga, Director, Environment Climate Gender and Social Inclusion Division, International Fund for Agricultural Development

Presenters: 

  • Lee Nelson, Research Programme Manager Climate Change, Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research
  • Iwona Piechowiak, Programme Leader for Sustainable Forests and Landscapes Pillar, Pacific Community, Fiji
  • Ulamila Lutu, Senior Research Technician, Centre for Pacific Crops and Trees, Pacific Community, Fiji
  • Gibson Susumu, Programme Leader, Sustainable Agriculture Programme, Pacific Community, Fiji
  • Minoru Nishi Jr, Managing Director, Nishi Trading Company, Tonga    
  • Susana Yalikanacea, Farmer, Fiji    
  • Jabujka Aikne, Farmer, Republic of the Marshall Islands

  

 

12.15pm – 2.00pm

Agriculture development for climate benefit

Many farmers in developing countries face significant barriers to maintaining secure livelihoods. Now farming and development investment must focus on the ‘triple win’: increasing productivity while reducing emissions and building resilience to the effects of climate change. But how? This session presents case studies analysing the greenhouse gas impact of agriculture development projects from the Fijian and Colombian dairy sectors to Vietnamese rice producers. A panel will provide insights on how agriculture development investment can play a more effective role in achieving the triple win.

Facilitator: 

  • Bruce Campbell, Director, CCAFS programme of CGIAR

Presenters: 

  • Liz Wedderburn, Assistant Research Director, AgResearch, New Zealand   
  • Justin Kosoris, Consultant to AgResults Secretariat, Australia
  • Lini Wollenburg, Low Emissions Development Flagship Leader, CCAFS programme of CGIAR

Panel: 

  • Jessica Bensemann, Development Manager Agriculture, New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade
  • Lee Nelson, Research Programme Manager Climate Change, Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research
  • Paxina Chileshe-Toe, Climate Change Adaptation Specialist, International Fund for Agriculture Development
  • Dr Chu Van Chuong, Deputy Director General, International Cooperation, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development, Vietnam    
  • Juan Lucas Restrepo, Chief Executive, Agro-Savia, Colombia (by video) 

  

2.15pm – 3.15pm

Scaling-up agroecology: its performance and potential

Agroecology allows farmers to achieve production, environmental, social and sanitary standards. What are the key challenges and opportunities to scale it up? This session will describe how agroecology performs and will share real-life experiences of scaling up.

Opening: 

  • Didier Guillaume, Minister of Agriculture and Food, France (by video)

Presentation: 

  • Alain Peeters, Secretary of Agroecology Europe, RHEA Research Centre

Round table discussion: 

  • Patrice Burger, President, CARI
  • Pierre Rousseau, Senior Strategic Adviser for Sustainable Finance, BNP Paribas     
  • (tbc) Carrefour Poland
  • Food and Agriculture Organization

 

3.30pm – 4.45pm

Market demand for sustainably produced food

The market is signalling that sustainable production will become an increasingly important pre-requisite for entry to higher value markets. Many retailers and food service businesses have publicly committed to sourcing all of their food from sustainable sources.  These businesses can only deliver on their promises if their suppliers process in a sustainable manner and source from primary producers who also have sustainable production at the centre of their operations. In this session, a global food company will outline its requirements in relation to sustainable sourcing. The session will address changes in consumer behaviour, evolving trends towards sustainable living, and Ireland’s response to the challenge.

Facilitator:  

  • John Muldowney, Agriculture Inspector, Department of Agriculture, Food and Marine, Government of Ireland

Presenters: 

  • Grace Binchy, Trends & Insight Specialist, Bord Bia – The Irish Food Board
  • (tbc) Representative from multinational food company
  • Michael Maloney, Director of Origin Green Programme, Bord Bia – The Irish Food Board

 

5.00pm – 6.00pm

Farmers working towards lower emissions

Farmers the world over want to improve their livelihoods, build resilience to the impacts of climate change and reduce their emissions.  They want to grow the best, most nutritious food they can. Farmers and governments acknowledge that they are not necessarily well equipped to achieve this.  Disseminating information to millions of farmers around the world is a considerable challenge. One of the best ways to meet this challenge is for farmers to get together and share stories of what they are doing – in other words, learn from each other. 

Facilitator: 

  • Ben O’Brien, European Regional Manager, Beef + Lamb New Zealand

Panel:  

  • Katie Milne, National President, Federated Farmers, New Zealand
  • David Burger, Strategy and Investment Leader Responsible Dairy, Dairy NZ   
  • Conor Mulvihill, Director, Dairy Industry Ireland
  • Pip Band, Industry Sustainability Framework Manager, Meat and Livestock Australia

 

 

10.45am – 12.15pm

Agroecology: what it encompasses and how it is implemented

The aspiration to move towards agroecology has been included in the French Law for the Future of Agriculture, Food and Forestry adopted in 2014. Agroecology aims to improve the synergies between adaptation, mitigation and food security by using nature-based solutions such as sustainable use of biodiversity water. This session will describe the contribution of agroecology to climate change mitigation and adaptation, and share experiences from several countries.

Opening: 

  • Didier Guillaume, Minister of Agriculture and Food, France (by video)

Scene setting:

  • (tbc) José Graziano da Silva, Director-General, Food and Agriculture Organization

Presenters: 

  • (tbc) Jean-Francois Soussana, Vice-President International Policy, INRA Science and Impact    
  • Food and Agriculture Organization
  • Roundtable discussion

 

3.15pm – 4.15pm

Building capability in agricultural measurement, reporting and verification (MRV)

Agricultural emissions are significant for many countries owing to the importance of the agriculture sector in their economies. Technical mitigation potential in the agricultural sector is high, however many countries cannot transparently monitor the emission reductions they achieve through productivity gains and more efficient farm management because national greenhouse gas inventory reporting systems and supporting data are insufficiently developed.    This session will demonstrate the importance of improved MRV of agricultural greenhouse gas emissions, including for soil organic carbon. It will look at efforts being made at the international and country level to enable the agriculture sector to contribute to the effective implementation of the Paris Agreement.

Facilitator:  

  • Hayden Montgomery, Special Representative, Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases

Presenters: 

  • Hugh Martineau Agriculture Business Area Manager, Ricardo Energy & Environment, United Kingdom
  • Karl Richards, Head of Environment, Soils and Land-Use Department, Teagasc, Ireland
  • Lini Wollenberg, Low Emissions Development Flagship Leader, CCAFS programme of CGIAR

 

4.30pm – 6.00pm

Raising the ambition of agriculture in NDCs: 2020 and beyond

Global food insecurity is increasing. Indicative figures suggest the agriculture sector is tracking to achieve only 21-40% of the 1Gt emissions reductions needed annually from the sector to meet the Paris Agreement’s objectives. Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) provide opportunities to effect change to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve livelihoods. Hear what experts are considering to kick start efforts to raise ambition within the agricultural sector for mitigating emissions ahead of the 2020 NDC review period.

Facilitator:  

  • John Carnegie, Executive Director Energy & Infrastructure, BusinessNZ, New Zealand

Presenters: 

  • Manish Bapna, Executive Vice President, World Research Institute   
  • Ben O’Brien, European Regional Manager, Beef + Lamb New Zealand

Panel:  

  • Martien Van Nieuwkoop, Director of Global Agriculture, World Bank   
  • Ignacio Lorenzo, Director of Climate Change, MGAP, Uruguay   
  • (tbc) World Farmers’ Organisation

Closing: 

  • Hayden Montgomery, Special Representative, Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases

  

Event partners

Act!on Agriculture is proudly brought to you by New Zealand, France, Ireland, Australia and the Netherlands.

 

Meet the COP24 event experts

Below are biographies of just some of our speakers.

Dr David Burger - DairyNZ, New Zealand

David is the strategy and investment leader for responsible dairying at DairyNZ. David joined DairyNZ as a water quality specialist before becoming a manager of the environment team, a role he held until joining the executive team in March 2018.

Craige MacKenzie - Agri Optics, New Zealand

Craige is an arable and dairy farmer focused on Precision Agriculture. He is a member of the Foundation for Arable Research (FAR) Strategic Research Committee, Chair of the Precision Agriculture Association of NZ (PAANZ), Board member of Precision Agriculture Australia (SPAA) and a NZ delegate to the International Society of Precision Agriculture (ISPA). Craige is a New Zealand Nuffield Scholar and in has been the recipient of various awards most recently being the Ballance Farm Environmental Awards Supreme Award for the Canterbury region.

Katie Milne - National President, Federated Farmers of New Zealand

Katie's work at Federated Farmers covers a wide range of topics from dealing with environmental and animal welfare issues to improving the image of farming by highlighting positive stories from the rural sector. Policy responsibilities: Biosecurity, International Trade, Rural Health, Workplace Health & Safety, Walking Access, Local Government. Liaison with Rural Women NZ.

Turi McFarlane - Nuffield Scholar, New Zealand

A background combining farm systems and natural resource management drives Turi McFarlane’s passion to enhance the sustainability of New Zealand’s primary sector. Of Te Atiawa and Ngai Tahu decent, Turi also has a keen interest in Maori agribusiness. Turi is working in a new role with Ravensdown Environmental, as Senior Farm Environmental Consultant. Turi previously worked for Beef+Lamb NZ as South Island environment extension manager. His interest in agricultural systems and sustainable land management led to tertiary study at Massey University where he completed a Bachelor of Science with a double major in Agricultural Science and Ecology which was followed by a Master of Applied Science at Lincoln University majoring in International Rural Development.

Ben O'Brien - Regional Manager Europe, Beef+Lamb NZ, New Zealand

Ben O’Brien has been involved in the meat industry for over 25 years, initially in research and development, then in technical and trade policy. He is based in Brussels for the New Zealand sheep and beef sector where he is developing and maintaining relationships with European farming organisations and policy makers and contributing to agricultural and trade policy discussions.

Christopher Brankin - Policy Adviser – Strategy and Influence, Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu, New Zealand

Christopher Brankin was raised in rural Canterbury, but whakapapas to Oraka Aparima, at the southern end of Aotearoa. For the past five years Chris has been working within the Strategy and Influence team within Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu who are responsible for external relationship management, primarily with Crown entities, and are charged with protecting and enhancing the rights and interests of Ngāi Tahu whānui.  Previous to this role, Chris supplemented his tertiary studies with employment on a number of farms. Over the last two years, Chris has been part of a team charged with developing a tribal Climate Change Strategy for Ngāi Tahu. As an intergenerational entity (with significant interests in agriculture), Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu must consider options to ensure that our people can be resilient and successful regardless of what may come, and to play our part in contributing to a low emissions future.

Michael Maloney, Ireland

Michael is the Director of the Origin Green Programme with Bord Bia – the Irish Food Board.  His previous roles in Bord Bia included Director of Quality Assurance and Director of Horticulture.  Before joining Bord Bia Michael was the CEO with Bord Glas – the Irish Horticulture Development Board.  Michael has a degree in Agricultural Science and a Master’s Degree in Animal Science.

Grace Binchy, Ireland

Grace works as a Trends & Insight Specialist with Bord Bia.  She worked for many years in the field of advertising, working with the Grey Group in London and New York as well as spending a significant period of time with the Publicis Group in Dublin.  Her love of insight led her to specialise in consumer research, working for Lansdowne, now part of the Kantar Group. Grace’s role in Bord Bia involves working with food and drinks companies from start-ups to more well established companies, helping them understand the importance of the consumer and develop their brand positioning for the market place. More recently Grace has taken on the role of managing Bord Bia’s trends and insight research programmes.

Ulamila Lutu, Fiji

A Senior Research Technician of Fijian/NZ nationality with over nine years of experience with the Pacific’s only internationally recognised genebank, the Centre for Pacific Crops and Trees (CePaCT) based in the Pacific Community (SPC) Suva Fiji.  Other unique roles within the Centre include assisting management to monitor and coordinate activities for the safety conservation of over 2000 in vitro regional and international clonal crops as well as facilitating the dissemination of germplasm to several key stakeholders and partners around the region as well as globally.

Gibson Susumu, Fiji

Programme Leader, Sustainable Agriculture Programme, Land Resource Division (LRD, the Pacific Community (SPC).  Gibson is a citizen of the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM). Mr Susumu holds a Master of Science in Agriculture from the National University of Science and Technology (NPUST) in Taiwan. He started his career as an academic for about 10 years. He then served as the Head of Agriculture, Forestry and Quarantine Services in the Federated States of Micronesia for five years. Gibson is currently the Programme Leader for the SPC Sustainable Agriculture Programme (SAP) within its Land Resource Division (LRD). As the Programme, he is responsible for the various programmes within LRD including, animal health and production, crop production systems, pests and diseases, and extension services. He has years of experience in leadership and management, policy and strategic planning, and developing networks and partnerships, food security and sustainable livelihood development, participatory research and extension approaches/models; and climate change adaptation for the agriculture sector

Iwona Piechowiak, Fiji

Iwona Piechowiak has over 10 years of experience contributing to the field of natural resources management, sustainable forests and landscape management and climate change. Presently, Iwona works as a Program Leader for Sustainable Forests and Landscapes Pillar of the of the Pacific Community (SPC) Land Resources Division. Iwona leads the team of experts in the implementation of over 10 projects on sustainable forest and land management, climate-smart landscapes management, forest genetic resources, restoration of degraded ecosystems and REDD+. Iwona is also a member of the World Overview and Conservation Approaches and Technology (WOCAT) network. Earlier she worked as a Natural Resources Management Officer and Sustainable Land and Water Management Specialist for the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations. Iwona is a Polish national.

Bertrand Mathieu

Bertrand is an Agronomist (phD) with 18 years of experience in the field of agrarian system analysis and characterization of farmer's practices and know-how, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa. He was involved in different action research projects for participatory design and adaptation of innovative cropping systems, with an emphasis on agroecological approach. Since 2016, he has been program officer at AVSF (Agronomists and Veterinary without Borders), in charge of strengthening AVSF interventions and teams in the field of agroecology. He is also actively involved in the working group on agroecological transition (GTAE with Agrisud, CARI andGRET), to generate references on the performance of agroecological systems and conditions for development in partnership with research.

 

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