New Zealand implements the UN Security Council’s sanctions concerning Iraq and Kuwait through the United Nations Sanctions (Iraq) Regulations 1991.

Sanctions were imposed concerning Iraq and Kuwait in 1990 with resolution 661 and have changed over time. You can find out more about the UNSC sanctions here (external link).

United Nations Sanctions (Iraq) Regulations 1991

New Zealand's sanctions regulations were last amended in 2008. You can find the full text of the regulations here (external link). These regulations apply to all persons inside New Zealand and to New Zealand citizens outside New Zealand.

A person breaching the sanctions regulations could be liable for up to 12 months imprisonment or a fine of up to $10,000. A company breaching the sanctions regulations could be liable for a fine of up to $100,000.

Some of the key restrictions in the sanctions regulations are outlined below. The following list is a summary only and is not comprehensive. We recommend that you look at the detailed regulations and obtain independent legal advice when making decisions about dealings with people or entities in Iraq.

Arms embargo

The regulations prohibit the direct or indirect export of “specified goods” to Iraq (defined in the regulations as meaning weapons and related materiel). The regulations also prohibit loading or carrying such arms onto a ship or aircraft, and other transactions or dealing with weapons that are intended for Iraq (see regulations 6-10, 18, and 20).

The regulations also prohibit selling, transferring, carrying or delivering the following for the benefit of the Government of Iraq or any person or business in Iraq:

  • technology related to the production, utilisation or stockpiling of weapons, or
  • materials and services designed to be used in giving training in relation to the design, development, manufacture, use, maintenance or support of weapons, or
  • technical support services in support of the above (see regulation 13).